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is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 invasion of mexico." the title of "a wicked war" is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant, from late in his life, grant looked back sort of on everything you done in his career and in his memoirs he writes very frankly about the experiences that he is had, the good and bad, and it makes a really good reading. at one thing that grant spent some time thinking and talking of late in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. and grant said, you know, at the time i do not think there was ever a more wicked more than that waged by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evol
director of the americas program. a preview of the looking at mexico, the run-up and aftermath of the 2012 electoral campaign. tracking democracy at a time of uncertainty. in 2011, there were no obvious front-runners. even according to duncan would, who wrote one of the first monographs in our series, the main issues seem to be security. after the runup, it was the same thing, beginning on the heels of the highest spike in violent crime in mexico's history. and following the ill-conceived u.s. operation, fast and furious. the national action party primary added drama, as did the campaign, in which security was still a huge issue. beneath the surface of mexico's public discourse, attitudinal changes were taking place. public safety began to recede as the candidates assured the public that they would not back down from the task of reducing criminal violence. issues of accountability, competitiveness, winning utility of monopolies jumped on to date -- waning utility of monopolies jumped onto the plate. surprise of surprises, lame duck president felipe calderon shepherded a landmar
for good reading. what he talk about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war in 1846, and grant said, you know, at the time, "i do not think there was ever a more wicked war than that waged on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus,
distance between us: a memoir." she shares her experiences growing up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states legally -- illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. now >> joining us now is reyna grande who was the author of a memoir, "the distance between us" is what it's called. what is reyna grande, where did you grow up? >> where did i grow up. up, i was born in a small city in mexico.'s three nobody has really heard of it. it's about three hours away from acapulco. dri it's in land and if you're driving from mexico city to acapulco, you have to pass by it >>ent how big isn't? >> it was very small when i was growing up. pe there it has about over 100,000 people there but i grew up in they. outskirts of the city. so to me it felt more like auray small town. rt it was very rural. you know, there were dirt roads, no running water. tha the city was very unstable. so that's where i grew up, in the the outskirts very, very close to the mountains. which are very, very beautiful, and, you know, very meaningful to me because when my parents came to the u.s.,
are enjoying your time at the exhibition. a decision by mexico's congress to offer free health care is proving popular to mexico and their neighbors. it provides universal health coverage to anyone who cannot afford coverage. americans are now getting free medical care. >> this is what retirement looks like for some americans living in mexico. it is not about taking it easy. it is about having a good time, especially for women like win the rose. >> you cannot find this lifestyle at this price in the united states or anywhere else. >> she is not the only one that thinks this is a retiree's paradise. there are 13,000 foreigners living here. the beautiful architecture, the great weather, and the relatively low cost of living are just a few reasons why american retirees have been flocking here over the last two years, but now they have another reason to move to mexico, and that is free medical care. while in the u.s., free medical care is only available for people over 65, in mexico it is available for everyone. under the program, universal medical care is no longer linked to employment. dr. and t
of cooperate banking of bank of america. we'll be joined by the finance minister from mexico and oli reign will be joining us. plenty more to come on our coverage of the world economic forum in davos. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll be singing too! pick up the phone and call hoveround, the premier power chair. hoveround makes it easier than any other power chair. hoveround is more maneuverable to get you through the tightest doors and hallways. moreeliable. hoveround employees build your chair, deliver your chair, and will service your chair for as long as you own your chair. most importantly, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for little or no cost. call now for your free dvd and information kit. you don't really have
pasajeros que murieron junto a jenni rivera en el accidente aereo en mexico el mes pasado, demandaron hoy a la empresa de la cantante por presunta negligencia alegando que la artista fue quien contrat la aeronave.. ---victor hugo rodriguez nos amplia.. 0:01 0:09 0:44 1:07 take pkg stop open blanca ---activistas en el sur y este de la bahia se movilizan para exigir mejor trato a los indocumentados que viven en nuestra region.. ---pilar niÑo nos cuenta como crece la presion para que mas condados cambien su aplicacion del programa "comunidades seguras".. 0:01 0:09 0:17 0:33 0:40 0:59 1:19 1:38 ---la eleccin del 2012 fue clave para reaviviar una reforma migratoria. ---el gigante dormido, es decir el electorado latino, finalmente despert y reelegi a obama. ---hoy un grupo de estudiantes de san jos dieron un primer paso para reiniciar el debate. take 2 box ---jaime peluffo nos amplia.. jaime.. 0:01 0:10 0:30 0:40 0:57 1:43 1:53 take pkg ---a partir del proximo lunes, los estudiantes indocumentados graduados de preparatorias californianas... take vo ....podran solicitar en internet las becas "c
followed by mayors and homeland security officials discussing the u.s.-mexico border. later, another look at gun violence was chicago mayor rham emmanuel and former congressman oeven latourette. >> i do solemnly swear. [applause] >> this weekend that 57 presidential inauguration as president obama begins his second term sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house live shortly before noon eastern. your phone calls and a look back at the president's 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the public inaugural ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other inaugural festivities including the capitol luncheon in the afternoon parade live all day coverage beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time on c-span , c-span radio and c-span.org and throughout the day join the conversation by phone, facebook and on twitter. >> and throughout inauguration day our website has additional features including video feeds from our c-span crews, video on demand of the day's major events , and a block of behind-the-scenes photos all at c-span.org. >> attorney
a lawsuit attempting to block the proposed $21 billion merger of anheuser-busch with mexico's group of modelo. the suit argues that the deal, which would give anheuser-busch control of more than half of the beer market would raise prices on american consumers. >>> and it is the end of an era. >> i have plenty of new outlets. i ran this morning for 30 minutes. >> does that include drive heaving. >> and wet and sure i thought i'd have a job right now but i don't need to work. >> okay. it's pretty sad. after seven seasons, 14 emmys and 12 screen actor guilds awards, "30 rock" will air its final sitcom tonight. many say it's changed comedy forever. we've even heard it compare to the legendary mary tyler moore show. and there is a long line of celebrities who guest starred on "30 rock" among them, oprah, al gore, and matt damon and then there is this little clip. >> you listen-clip. >> you listen to me, blitzer, either cnn gets back on the avery jessop story or i'll tell everyone your real name, steel hammerhands. hello? steel? mr. hammerhands? >> oh, i love that moment. even our own wol
. the others say the drug gangs have begun fighting for parts of mexico city. >> this is one of the most violent neighborhoods in mexico city. police are stopping vehicles to look for weapons and contraband. the surge in violence in mexico city has some business leaders openly questioning if that means the drug cartels are operating in fighting for turf in the capital. that is something the mayor of mexico city denies. he says this is common crime on the streets of mexico. we are seeing leaders in the state saying it is a battle for tariff -- turf between two battling cartels. that is acceptable. what is not acceptable is any admission we might have cartels fighting for turf in the capital. in recent years thousands have been left dead. mexico city has been a relative safe haven that has not seen the levels of violence seen elsewhere. >> water resources in peru are drying up so fast that in three years, one region may no longer be able to produce any crops. the main culprit is the demand for asparagus. >> it is harvest time on the farm. workers cut down spears of the spirit is one by one
with our cover story along the border between arizona and mexico. >> reporter: john lab owns 14,000 wild acres in southern arizona, straight up against the mexican border. it's land that's become extremely valuable for something besides ranching. >> come on. reporter: for mexico's illegal immigrants and drug cartels, it's a golden pathway into the u.s. >> the easy part of getting across here is you've got three miles to walk. that's it. you get picked up at the highway. you're gone. >> reporter: five generations of his family have lived here. the family journeyed west over gritty trails in covered wagons in 1894. more than a century later he watches from his kitchen window as new immigrants, the illegal kind regularly march across his land. oddly undeterred by the border fence, government surveillance cameras and border agents patrolling the property. how many illegal immigrants do you estimate have crossed your property? >> i'd say about a half million people have been caught on the ranch. >> reporter: that's the size of a city. >> that's right. that's what's been caught. that's not wha
que tuvieron algunos incendios podria ser por filtracion de liquidos en las baterias y mexico estaria a la espera de uno de estos aviones y serviria de transporte para el presidente de enrique peña nieto. y el gobierno de mexico piensa que hay que comprarlo mexico pagara 750 millones de dolares de 220 que cuesta normalmente. el airforce 1 cuesta 300 informacion en pantalla perk aca en estados unidos tienen dos airforce one. >> actualmente en el mundo se sacaron del aire por incendios en la cabina en algunas naves mexicop va a comprar uno de ellos pero por el triple del precio así que tienen que explicar el por que. el air force one cuesta unos 300 millones de dólares. >> el presidente de la compañía boeig dijo que respaldan su integridad. >> aeromexico comprara 19 y en estados unidos hay 6. >> y la entrega de la nave presidencial señora para el próximo año. >> y en argelia hubo 11 secuestrados y varios heridos y se busca responsables. >> las fuerzas argelinas trataron de rescatar a 40 extranjeros y cientos de argelinos que estaban prisioneros por una ala de al qaeda. un rehen
- personas fueron arrestadas en este operativo...17- en mexico... segun el director de ice john morton, las victimas son cada vez de menos edad..y los abusadores son hombres y tambien mujeres...ice pide ayuda a la comunidad para capturarlos... "que vean las fotos de estos individuos que hicieron estas cosas terribles contra personas inocentes, necesitamos que nos ayuden, que nos llamen, si tienen cualquier tipo de detalle" si tiene informacion, puede conectarse a la pagina en internet...www.ice.gov/tips o llame al 1-866--dhs-2-ice estos operativos de ice para hacer frente a estas actividades ilicitas que amenazan a niÑos y jovenes continuaran.. el aÑo pasado, mas de 1-600 depredadores de niÑos fueron arrestados. despues de buscar arduamente el paradero de su ser querido, una familia latina recibe malas noticias. las autoridade s encontraron sus restos, claudia uceda, nos amplia es la noticia que temian escuchar "la ultima vez que lo e el viernes." despues de mas de un ano de estar desaparecido,las autoridades informaron a esta familia boliviana, que encontraron los restos de oscar velasc
, and violence in mexico, exchange traded funds following stocks in those markets did better last year than the s&p 500. we spoke with stuart schweitzer, vice chairman and global markets strategist at j.p. morgan private bank. >> tom: welcome back to n.b.r. and happy new year. >> as you look across the globe and put your client's money to work, what global market do you see as poised for the best stock market. >> we're really optmistic about non-japan asia. china has bottomed, we think, and that should help chinese stocks and stocks in greater china, and i think it should help stocks across asia. it should also help a little bit in the natural resources producing economies, brazil and peru. >> tom: and what about brazil -- >> another one. >> tom: why not japan. >> japan has a positive impetus from a changep change of policy. >> tom: lots of new government spending, trying to pull that economy out from the doldrums it has been in for almost a generation. >> that's what they say, and they've said that before. and the question is not will they do something -- they will. the question is will they kee
to be the united states. tavis: where? >> i got a visa from the university of new mexico. i flew with a dollars in traveler's checks in my pocket. when i landed, i was $5 short for my ticket. an american man behind me gave the $5. that was my first impression of america. that people are generous and helpful here. tavis: the extra $5 got you to new mexico. >> right. tavis: but when you get here, your english is not so good. >> yes, i tried to learn more, but i could not remember anything. tavis: so you soldiered to new mexico. it is one thing when you do not have any money, but you cannot speak the language. when you get to new mexico, how do you navigate your way through? how do you make this work? >> all right, first, i studied english as a second language. the connections to the homeland, i knew i could not go back. i knew i had to stay here. i stayed with my english teacher so that i could learn more english quickly, and then i observed that my english teacher could not find a job with a ph.d. in literature. tavis: that is not funny, but it is. >> so i thought i was going to study comparativ
? is it painful for him to talk about what happened to him in mexico? >> well, he is apprehensive. he has gone over with some friends he trusts about what is appropriate for him to say publicly. its scary situation. he doesn't want to bring any danger to his family or unless the future. its tough situational down there because you are dealing with quasi authoritative people. you are dealing with could mexican authorities. >> bill: i understand he was threatened in prison. he said that himself, he was threatened with decapitation by fellow prisoners. that is true, right? >> yes. >> bill: and also the prison down there is infested with the locetas who are a drug dealing gang who kill people with impunity. this is the apprehension. he doesn't want to say too much about that because he fear reprisals from south of the border? >> there is always that chance. there were comments leading to indicate that. he wants to get thank you and thank the american public for getting him out but he wants to do it in way that makes sense. >> bill: certainly we understand that, but we are concerned because he had
trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly listen i want to hear questions you want to ask. but i'm going to end and turn it to my friend and colleague from mexico. [applause] >> our final guest speaker comes from the other side of the border with mexico in his name is eduardo olmos. he represents the city on the other side of texas, sort of the southwestern part of texas i guess, just the americans trying to visualize where it is. he beats an industrial city in the border state -- a corrective and it did appear. threatened by organized crime and continues to be attractive to business. it is also a federal congressman deeply invested immigration security issues. he spent time in the united states for school and were lucky he will it trespass in english today. please welcome, mr. mayor. thank you for coming up. [applause] >> thank you very much. i hope my english is not to be understood. i want to thank for the end education and acknowledge alan bersin and all of th
's look at mexico for a second. mexico in the 1960s banned all guns except 38 specials. they could only have in mexico today small handguns to protect themselves. how is that working out for mexico? they are being slaughtered by the thousands by people with illegal guns, the drug cartels have automatic weapons. we want to keep the semi automatic weapons to keep ourselves. >> i can argue mexico has other problems as well. adam: with me point out, according to the fbi -- they cannot protect their citizens and neither can our government protect our citizens. adam: from 2007-2011 on more than several locations averagg 200 to 240 different instances where there is justifiable homicide with the use of a gun in which a person was protecting themselves, this is the definition, during the commission of a felony by the private citizen killed somebody committing a felony. and this was justifiable homicide. this adds credence to the argument a lot of people have guns to protect themselves, doesn't it? >> certainly. there is not a lot in the area second amendment law, but that is part of it, people
. that is what it was to me. >>host: wear reborn? >>guest: did mexico, southern mexico in a little town nobody has heard of that when i mentioned an odd couple quote but it was three hours from there. >>host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >>guest: and my father came 1977 and i was three years old and sent for my mother a few years later said she caved 1981 i was four and half. >>host: when did you come? t. when i came to the.states 1985. in may. i was nine and a half going on than. >>host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? >>guest: i was separated from my father for 80 years when he returned to mexico my siblings and i convinced him to bring him back here because he would not come back to mexico and we did not want to spend anymore time separated from him. so we begged him. with father did not want to bring me because i was nine and a half and he thought i could not make it across the border and we had to run illegally. so we took of us from mexico city and right on the border of tijuana. it was so long today bus ride because i had rar
jail sentence for kidnapping and organized crime. adam reports from mexico city. >> this police raid forage was so convincing that the mexican public and judges were sure that the french woman was a criminal. the only problem was that the video was staged the day after she was actually arrested. later, it emerged that the federal police chief at the time staged a raid from the country's two top tv networks. she is currently serving a 60- year jail sentence for kidnapping and organized crime. but on wednesday, mexico's supreme court could rule whether her constitutional rights were violated. the kidnapping victims were found at the ranch where she was staying with her boyfriend. he confessed to the kidnapping, but said she had nothing to do with it. she has always maintained her innocence and victims have testified against her have given contradictory information about her involvement. if the judges ruled that the footage tinted her sentence, it could lead to very eventual freedom. last year, supreme court judges said there were violations in her trial, but did not go as far as orderi
. heading home, why a french woman jailed in mexico for kidnapping is on her way home. >> good have you back. we will go down towards the mediterranean. we have this area of low pressure there will bring you a lot of rain to many locations. it is down here toward palermo in southern italy that sees over 158 millimeters of rain in the last 24 hours. the rain will continue over the next couple of days. precipitation over her towards athens. where it is the darkest, that is where we will see localized flooding. up here it will be cold. in berlin, a high temperature only at eight to minus 3 degrees. northern africa, quite a bit of clouds. rain pours out years as well as -- rain appear in algiers as well as in tunis. also remaking its way here, low clouds as well. temperature's only getting into the middle teens. toward cairo, only reaching 23 degrees. down toward central portions of africa, we will be seeing mostly clear conditions, but we are seeing some clouds here. along the coastal regions, saturday, january 26 at 8:00 p.m. >> headlines here now on al jazeera. china calling for restraint aft
32nd. press freedom is especially in danger in countries like mexico and eritrea, which ranks last. turning our focus to mexico where press freedom groups are demanding more protection for journalists in the central american nation. >> our next report shows the gruesome reality for reporters there since the start of the government's war on drugs in 2006. since then, 67 journalists have been killed, and 14 more have disappeared. >> in july of last year, police recovered the mutilated bodies of three photojournalist from a river in the mexican port city of veracruz. they had taken victims of victims of the drug war currently waging in mexico. the photos sealed their fate. the body of reporter regina martinez was also found in the same state. she was looking into connections between drug cartels and the political world. she was tortured and choked to death. mexican ngo's said 91 journalists have been killed in 12 years. it is impossible to guess how many more reporters have been intimidated or frightened into giving up their profession. those journalists rarely go public with their st
organizaciones locales. ...unos mensajes..pero en minutos.. encuentran en mexico cadaveres pertenecientes a integrantes ..en mexico, los cadÁveres de al menos de ocho integrantes del grupo musical kombo kolombia fueron encontrados anoche en el fondo de un pozo en el municipio de mina en el estado de nuevo leÓn. el grupo mexicano, especializado en ritmos colombianos como el vallenato, habÍa sido secuestrado en la madrugada del pasado viernes mientras actuaba en una fiesta privada.. las autoridades trabajaban en la confirmacio Ón de la identidad de los muertos... las labores de rescate se vieron complicadas por la presencia de gran cantidad de agua y no se descarta que hayan mÁs cada veres. ..otra pausa..pero en unos momentos...los deportes...y ya aqui el socio oscar burgos.. para un buena noches para todos y bienvenidos al resumen del futbol profesional y lo vamos inciar en guatemala con una jornada incompleta a falta de un partido. el primer partido se jugo en san marcos, donde marquense de local supero 2-0 al deportivo suchitepequez con goles de terencio de oliveira y jonathan perez
fue organizado por la camara de comercio de mexico, el consejo nacional de pamana y organizaciones de negocios del area gracias silvana...y mientras en el capitolio se realizan los ultimos ensayos para las ceremonias de juramentacion de este domingo y lunes, organizaciones hispanas en washington evaluan lo que han sido los primeros 4 anos de la administracion obama.... fernado pizarro, nos amplia...ea tomado decisiones importantes para la comunidad hispana, dicen organizaciones latinas, aunque la evaluacion no es del todo positiva, especialmente en el tema migratorio. sentimos que ha tomado decisiones que son problematic as como por ejemplo algunas de las cesiones que se tomaron con respecto a la economia, que impactan todavia de manera de vigente a nuestra comunidad de manera disproporcional y particularmente con la situacion de la deportacion. obviamente en el tema migratorio que es algo muy en el corazon de los latinos, no se vio el progreso que queriamos y se ha visto el aumento de las deportaciones, pero esperamos que en este 2do termino ya la situacion es propicia para avanzar 1
, right here. now, alan was born in mexico. he was brought to this country by his parents when he was a child. growing up, alan went to an american school. pledged allegiance to the american flag. felt american in every way and he was except for one. on paper. in high school alan watched his friends come of age driving around town if their new licenses, earning some extra cash from their jobs at the mall. he knew he couldn't do those things. but it didn't matter that much. what mattered to alan was earning an education so that he could live up to his god-given potential. last year, when alan heard the news that we were going to offer a chance for folks like him to emerge from the shadows, even if it's just for two years at a time, he was one of the first to sign up. and a few months ago, he was one of the first people in nevada to get approved. in that moment alan said, i felt the fear vanish. i felt accepted. so today alan's in a second year at the college of southern nevada. alan's studying to become a doctor. he hopes to join the air force. he's working hard every single day to
's mexico. liz: mexico. what about mexico? up next, a portfolio manager who specifically is going to tell you where to turn, which countries, which sovereign debt, a few countries would surprise you. david: that was poland, the first country we showed you. we'll test you throughout the hour. didn't agree with the defense cuts, but pushed them a few months ahead meaning hundreds of thousands of private sector jobs are still at risk. how will they keep the contracts? what happens? to all the companies that put in bids for contracts? we'll tell you specifically coming up on "after the bell." ♪ ♪ this is $100,000. we asked total strangers to watch it for us. thank you so much. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. they didn't take a dime. how much in fees does your bank take to watch your money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of re
gangs have begunfighting in the city. >> we are in one of the most violent neighborhoods in mexico city and police are stopping vehicles looking for weapons to see if anybody has contraband. this surge and violence in recent days in mexico city has some business leaders openly questioning if that means drug cartels are operating and perhaps fighting here in the capital. that's something the mayor of mexico city flat-out denies and rejects that and says it's just common crime in the streets of mexico. robberies have gone bad. you are seeing people now, the leaders in the state of mexico, this area that rings the capital and are saying there is a battle for turk there between two leading cartels. that's politically acceptable. what isn't politically acceptable is any admission we might have cartels fighting for turks in the capital because in recent years as drug violence raged across the country leaving tens of thousands of people dead, mexico city has been a relatively safe haven that hasn't been anything like the refusals -- levels of violence elsewhere. >> to the growing nightmare for
? then a factor exclusive the former marines injustly incarcerated in mexico will tell us his story. i had a massive he. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. ♪ [ male announcer ] let's take every drop of courage, every ounce of inspiration, every bit of determination, and go where we've never gone before. ♪ introducing the radically new avalon. toyota. let's go places. but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all waited for. when we sit on the edge of our seats for four quarters. it represents players reaching a childhood dream. the biggest stage there is in sports. a time when legacies are made. where a magical play can happen every snap, and you remember exactly where you were when it does. watch every moment of super bowl xlvii live on nfl mobile. bringing the big game to you when every play matters... verizon. call star-star nfl to download nfl mobile from verizon. [ male
? then a factor exclusive the former marines injustly incarcerated in mexico will tell [ female announcer ] caltrate's done even more to move us. because vitamin d3 helps bones absorb calcium, caltrate's double the d. it now has more than any other brand to help maximize calcium absorption. so caltrate women can move the world. office superstore ink retailer in america. now t $6 back in staples rewards for every ink cartridge you recyc when you spend $50 on hp in staples. th was easy. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo sh
? then a factor exclusive the former marines injustly incarcerated in mexico will tell us his story. a oo liberal columnist dave keller and carr criticized their onus in westchester county gently for printing the names and addresses of people entitled to own firearms. juan williams defended them while others stood by aghast. mary katherine still looking aghast. i will start with you. looks like juan is almost alone now in the defense of this dopey newspaper. what do you think is going on with williams? >> there's a long answer but we will cut to the chase. these are first semester journalistic efforts. so basic even the new york times has this. this is me agreeing with the new york times. it is different often between things that are public and whether they are news worthy whether you should be pairing those things in the newspaper. these are something journalists tackle all of the time. there are a lot of things that are public. they are probably juicy and fun to read but are you doing a public service by printing them? people on food stamps most people would argue that wouldn't be a good idea t
" tonight from even further southwest, way down here in old mexico. los angeles, california, which of course used to be part of mexico until we took it by force, and then started building fences to keep mexicans out of old mexico. >> i'm here today because the time has come. >> right now the president is in the air. >> for common sense. >> he is expected to lay out his own vision. >> outline his immigration priorities. >> immigration reform. >> the immigration. >> immigration. >> immigration reform. >> our immigration system is broken. >> we need congress to act. >> the issue of immigration is not a simple one. >> look, senator, rubio is for it. >> he is now the emissary. >> the face of the national tea par party. >> i think we'll do a tremendous service to our country. >> they may get a deal on immigration. >> it wouldn't be a quick process, but will be a fair process. >> the so-called embrace of immigration reform, but not so fast. >> why are we doing this? the president is in las vegas today. >> back in las vegas. >> he imposes enforcement. >> i believe we need to stay focused on enforcem
traveled to north korea with former new mexico governor bill richardson and seven others. he spoke with students at a university computer lab. schmidt has emphasized that he is traveling as a private citizen and not representing google, but some analysts say the visit was motivated by business. north korea wants to promote its i.t. industry and google is believed to be considering doing business there. the group met with north korean officials. richardson suggested that they discuss the release of a u.s. citizen detained in the country since last year. >> it's a good productive but frank meeting. >> they'll discuss their visit to north korea after they arrive. >>> japanese prime minister abe and his government have confirmed the outline to revitalize the nation's sluggish economy. cabinet ministers took part in the first meeting of a new task force on tuesday. >> translator: japan has been tackling deflation for ten years. it's an effort over the course of human history. we must attack the problem with three main policies. implementing bold monetary easing, flexible fiscal measures
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